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Abstract | Seleucid Time: Imperial and Indigenous Temporalities in the Hellenistic East

The Seleucid Era, the official tally of years employed by the Seleucid Empire, was the first linear and irreversible chronographic system in the ancient world. In my presentation I will explore the social and political effects of its regular duration and irreversibility on just one aspect of life in the Seleucid empire: market trade.

About Paul Kosmin

Paul J. Kosmin was born and raised in London. Having read Ancient and Modern History at Balliol College, Oxford (BA 2005), he moved to Harvard University for his PhD (2012). His first book, The Land of the Elephant Kings: Space, Territory, and Ideology in the Seleucid Empire (HUP, 2014), examines the relationship between the kings of the Seleucid dynasty and the landscape, from Bactria to Thrace, over which they ruled. More generally, Paul is interested in Hellenistic kingship and imperialism, ancient ethnography, interactions between the Greek and Near Eastern worlds, and Greek epigraphy. Current projects include a study of indigenous resistance to Hellenistic imperialism and an investigation of the role of magical rituals in city-state politics.

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