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Abstract | Συνοίκησις in Mycenaean Times? The Political and Cultural Geography of Attica in the 2nd Millennium BC

A number of scholars have expressed the view that the synoikismos (political unification) of Attica took place in Mycenaean times. This entails that the region evolved into an early state during the 13th c. BC. Drawing on this hypothesis, I will examine the available archaeological data from a wider (Bronze Age) socio-economic perspective, to explore whether the establishment of a Mycenaean state in Attica was historically feasible and, if yes, in what form. Then, I will examine briefly whether and how conditions of the 13th (and 12th) c. BC may have been reflected in later mythological traditions.

About Nikolas Papadimitriou

Nikolas Papadimitriou (PhD Ancient History and Archaeology, University of Birmingham, UK) is a Curator of Antiquities at the Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, Greece. His research interests include state formation processes in the prehistoric Aegean, death rituals as symbolic forms of communication, the social uses of imagery in Aegean art, Mediterranean interconnections in the 2nd millennium BC, and prehistoric technology. He has taught courses on the Aegean Bronze Age at the Universities of Birmingham, Athens and the Aegean, and published a monograph, several edited volumes and numerous papers on archaeological and museological matters. Currently he is involved in the study of prehistoric material from Marathon and Argos, the technological examination of Cycladic marble figurines (3rd millennium BC), and the publication of the conference “Athens and Attica in prehistory” held in Athens in May 2015. In 2000 he received the Michael Ventris Award for Mycenaean Studies by the Institute of Classical Studies, London, and in 2011 he was a Stanley J. Seeger Research Fellow at the Center of Hellenic Studies, Princeton University. At the CHS, he will examine the cultural and political geography of Attica in the 2nd millennium BC, in view of old and recent finds and in juxtaposition to Classical traditions and myths.

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